Author Archives: Adam

CFE Ironman Plan 2.0

Road map and training strategy for Ironman Arizona 2017

Sideline Reporter: You just finished your masters and spent the last two years killing yourself in business school – what’ll you do now?

Me: I dunno, work out?

[Airhorn]

[Confetti falls amidst laser light show, fireworks and white people dabbing]

In 2016 I aimed to get back into endurance sports – hard – and committed to complete my first ultramarathon in December of that year.

I laid out my Ultimate Ultra Plan and felt good to go for 50 miles. Then, after a routine 20-mile training trail run, my left foot developed a disturbing bruise on the inside arch.

With my history of Posterior Tibial Tendonitis (PTT), I decided to act like a grown-up and avoid escalating a mild bruise into another major injury.

I backed out of the 50-miler and prioritized starting 2017 as healthy as possible to gear up for the next big race:

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The Ultimate Ultra Plan: Take 1

Nutrition, gear and strategy for my first ultramarathon

Three years ago – almost to the day – I crossed a huge goal off The List and completed my first Ironman triathlon: Ironman Arizona 2013 in 13 hours and 30 minutes.

After the race, still high from one of the best experiences of my life, I wrote:

As much as I’m tempted to keep basking in my Ironman glory, I need to keep moving if I want to make this experience truly last…I can’t wait to build on this momentum and launch into new projects and races on the horizon.

Since then, projects ended up taking priority over races, and I spent most of my free time and energy outside of work in business school pursuing my MBA.

Now that I’ve graduated, I’ve shifted gears back to endurance racing and set my set my sights on tackling my first ultramarathon: the McDowell Mountain Frenzy 50-miler, on Dec. 3.

That’s two weeks away.

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Foot Fight 2: Getting back to barefoot

A minimalist runner’s battle to overcome posterior tibial tendon dysfunction continues

My Foot Fight began in 2012 when I suffered my first running injury. I was on a six-mile pseudo barefoot run in Vibram FiveFingers, at night, on a dirt path, when my left foot slammed on a rock. It shook me up, but I pressed on – like an idiot – and finished my run.

A few weeks later I completed the Lavaman Olympic Triathlon and then finally faced the music: a stress fracture of the second metatarsal.

Since then – despite the upsetting prognosis, and later a collapsed arch and Achilles tendon issues – I’ve kept the faith in minimalist running, committed to getting back to barefoot and trudged along the slow road to recovery.

Even though I’ve made a ton of progress, I’m still dealing with foot issues from those injuries – four years later. Namely: posterior tibial tendon (PTT) dysfunction.

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Finish line void

How to keep fitness a priority without a big race on the horizon

Footrace finish line, 1925

The desert heat didn’t used to phase me.

Three years ago, in my first triathlon blog post, I talked about staying motivated to conquer the pivotal battles that ensue on the sun-induced pre-dawn training path.

A year after that article, upon registering for my first Ironman triathlon, I went on to write about how Keanu taught me the importance of showing up.

Back then, with Ironman Arizona in my sights, I had no problem navigating the heat, waking up early for workouts, rushing to the gym after work, and squeezing in late-evening runs.

Now, about nine months after crossing the Ironman Arizona finish line, I’m singing a different tune.

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Ironman training plan, Crossfit Endurance style

A comprehensive look at the training logs, resources and thought processes behind my first Ironman triathlon

Double unders

About a year ago, I not only showed up and committed to taking on my first Ironman triathlon, but I also pledged to use an unconventional training program that focused on strength training and shorter distances at higher intensities.

The program is called Crossfit Endurance (CFE), and now that I’ve got my first Ironman in the books, I can say to you without a shred of doubt that it works.

But back then, I didn’t know it was going to work, so I spent hours researching CFE Ironman training plans to make sure I was headed in the right direction.

I found a lot of helpful resources and great advice – which you’ll read about later on – but I was never able to find a comprehensive, detailed training plan that didn’t require some form of payment or subscription.

To remedy that, for anyone in the same position I was in, I’m going to share my complete training logs, workout routines and resources, for free.

In this article, you’ll also read why I decided to go the CFE route (rather than the more conventional Long Slow Distance (LSD) approach), see what resources I used to help formulate my program and learn key tips to keep in mind when following CFE.

To begin, let’s take a look at the main reasons I opted for a Crossfit Endurance program, rather than LSD.

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Lookin’ good, doin’ good

Tri for Les t-shirts raised over $400 for the Arizona Humane Society!

TFL AZHS

Here you have it: proof that we didn’t run off to Belize with the revenue generated from our Tri for Les: IMAZ edition t-shirts

The Tri for Les community donated a grand total of $416.33 to the Arizona Humane Society in honor of our animal-loving aunt Leslie.

We dropped off the check the day after our big race (notice the tired in our eyes in the photos here).

Here’s an idea of what the donation amount will cover:

  • The average cost to care for an animal until it’s adopted ($300)
  • “Mercy grooms” for two neglected animals with painful, severely matted coats ($50 x 2)
  • Food and vaccinations for one animal for a week ($10)

We’re happy to have been able to give something back during our Ironman journey, and lucky to have such a generous crew in our corner.

Thanks to everyone who bought a shirt, rocked it on race day and otherwise supported the cause.

You guys rule! Be sure to remember that every time you wear, see or daydream about these shirts.

– Live every day –

Adam and Cecily

AF race report: Ironman Arizona

A recap with lessons learned from my first Ironman triathlon

medal

Three weeks ago, I crossed the finish line at Ironman Arizona in 13:30:18 and accomplished my biggest goal of the year: to become an Ironman.

The race was one of the best experiences of my life and I still haven’t come down from that high.

I frequently brag talk about the feat to anyone who’ll pretend to listen, replay the day in my head, and scroll through finisher photos, articles and notes from the race.

As much as I’m tempted to keep basking in my Ironman glory, I need to keep moving if I want to make this experience truly last.

Similar to my excitement at the beginning of the year to conquer Ironman Arizona, I can’t wait to build on this momentum and launch into new projects and races on the horizon.

But before moving on to what’s next (which I’ll detail in another article), I’m going to share analysis of my performance at Ironman Arizona.

By evaluating my performance and sharing the gory details, I hope to not only cement the takeaways in my head, but also offer insight to help other Ironmen in training.

Read on for an updated report of my taper week, analysis of the swim, bike and run, plus major lessons learned from drinking too much sports drink (hint: lots of time wasted in the Port-o-Potty) and failing to plan for the first few hours after the race (hint: a cold, stiff, delirious and cranky Adam).

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Ironman Arizona: Conquered!

A quick look at Adam and Cecily’s race results

Nov. 17, 2013: the day of our first Ironman triathlon, and one we’ll never forget.

We had a ton of support leading up to this race, in addition to a rowdy cheering section throughout the day. Thank you everyone, for everything!

We’re both feeling great – super sore and sleep deprived – but great.

Stay tuned for a detailed race report and analysis.

For now, here’s a brief summary of how we did.

Adam’s Ironman Arizona 2013 race stats

Adam Fuller, You are an Ironman!

Swim: 01:24:42
Bike: 06:25:45
Run: 05:25:29

Overall time 13:30:18

OVERALL RANK: 1623
DIV RANK: 153
GENDER RANK: 1269

Cecily’s Ironman Arizona 2013 race stats

Cecily Fuller, You are an Ironman!

Swim: 01:36:19
Bike: 07:31:19
Run: 06:21:08

Overall: 15:47:00

OVERALL RANK: 2319
DIV RANK: 48
GENDER RANK: 599

– Live every day –

Adam and Cecily

AF race strategy: Ironman instructions

Stop worrying. Here’s what you need to do to conquer Ironman Arizona

Alarm clock

Dear Future Adam,

Good morning. If you’re reading this, it’s early on Sunday, Nov. 17, 2013

The sun won’t rise for a few hours but your mind and nerves are already racing.

The dark windows, beeping alarm and creaky floorboards sing in a familiar harmony as you stumble out of bed for the start of a big day.

It’s OK. Take a deep breath, hold it for a couple seconds and close your eyes. Now, exhale slowly and calmly, and open your eyes.

There. Much, better.

Look to your right on the dresser: your clothes and shoes are laid out on the dresser and everything is in its place, packed and ready to go.

See? Business as usual.

Alright, now here comes a curve ball: after you turn on the lights, you’ll lean against the wall waiting for your eyes to adjust and feel a pang of anxiety that’s not so familiar. You’ll remember why today is different.

Today, you become an Ironman.

Probably didn’t get much sleep last night, did you?

I’m guessing you had nightmares about getting lost on the course, took multiple trips to the bathroom and spent a few wired hours lying in bed staring at the ceiling, desperately trying to slow down your heart rate.

That’s OK. Excitement is good, and most of the 2,800 other athletes are in the same boat.

Well now you’re awake, and it’s go time.

With all the adrenaline coursing through your veins this morning, it’ll be easy to get worked up, stressed out, and stray from the course that got you this far.

So take this letter as a reminder that you are very great – although you can be an idiot at times – and read the following instructions to stay on track, calm and in control during the 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile ride and 26.2-mile run:

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Road map to Ironman AZ: Part 4 – Two weeks out

A revamped training program, injury update and look ahead to taper week

World Alarm Clock - Grove Passage, London

Ironman Arizona is officially fourteen days away.

I see the finish line on the horizon, feel the excitement building and smell the victory approaching my reach.

However, I’m still so obsessed with my schedule, nutrition, race prep and hitting all my workouts (hhhawwrd) that the realness and nearness of race-day hasn’t quite sunk in for me.

That’s probably a good thing.

I’m feeling strong and confident heading into this final stretch, and despite the crazy, often self-induced, curve balls this year has thrown at me, I’ve built up some nice momentum and hope to ride it across the finish line on Nov. 17.

That momentum didn’t develop by accident.

I’ve spent a lot of time researching and planning as many angles of this journey as possible. And recently, I’ve made some major adjustments to my training plan and injury treatments that have helped keep me moving in the right direction.

In this post, you’re going to see an overview of the revised training program I’ve been following for the past few months, an update on my injuries and how they’re being treated, plus a look at my taper-week schedule.

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